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U.S. National Institute of Justice online event: DNA Evidence and Property Crimes

Category
Event
Date(s)
Subject
Policing

Description

This event examined the experiences of the cities collecting DNA evidence from property crimes, and discussed how other cities can determine if such procedures are right for them. The panel shared strategies for building partnerships among police, crime labs and prosecutors, and addressed other challenges a city may face as part of this endeavor.

Summary

DNA evidence is an increasingly powerful tool for solving crimes. Law enforcement officials have used DNA to solve violent crimes for years, but now research reveals that collecting DNA in property crimes, such as burglaries, is cost-effective and dramatically increases the number of suspects identified.

The cost of performing DNA analysis is decreasing, the amount of data in state and national DNA databases is increasing, and many DNA databases now include the DNA profiles of all convicted felons (both violent and nonviolent). Researchers have found that many property offenders do not limit their activities to crimes against property and may commit other offenses, including violent crimes and drug deals.

The event was moderated by Katharine Browning, Ph.D., Senior Social Science Analyst, National Institute of Justice. The panel included:

  • John Roman, Ph.D. — Researcher, Urban Institute
  • Mitch Morrissey — District Attorney, Denver, Colorado
  • Greg Matheson — Director, Los Angeles Police Department Criminalistics Laboratory
  • Philip Stanford — Detective, Denver Police Department

Information

Added on
20 Feb 2009
Origin
U.S. National Institute of Justice
Type
Online event
Venue description

US NIJ Online event

Organizer
U.S. National Institute of Justice
Participants
Experts
Keywords
forensics, identification, burglary, theft, DNA, evidence, crimes against property
Rights
U.S. National Institute of Justice